Photo 20 Aug 9,628 notes sullenmoons:

Bella Gingell

sullenmoons:

Bella Gingell

via Impulse.
Photo 20 Aug 177 notes batlesbo:

shoe-lord:

I really liked these panels… 
[GGAR is written/drawn by the lovely batlesbo]

One of the rare bittersweet moments in GGaR. 

batlesbo:

shoe-lord:

I really liked these panels… 

[GGAR is written/drawn by the lovely batlesbo]

One of the rare bittersweet moments in GGaR. 

Video 20 Aug 9,570 notes

continentcreative:

Adja Kaba by Joanna Lorenzo

Video 20 Aug 16,898 notes

flyingcuttlefish:

atopfourthwall:

uvsiren:

Discworld

I really need to read/watch the Discworld stuff.

Discworld is a lot more important than people give it credit.

Video 20 Aug 78,458 notes

solar-citrus:

I’ve received a lot of letters from artists asking to check out their artwork and their blog, and I’ve noticed that a lot of them openly write unhealthy amounts of negative comments about their artwork, it was super depressing, honestly.  :(
Confidence plays a very very important role as an artist, it’s what helps us learn and grow without the constant feeling of doubt and jealousy!  You are a unique individual who must go down your own unique path, and as scary as it sounds, you can’t rely on others to hold your hand all the way through.  You are the only one who can get yourself to where you need to go, and beating up your artwork is not the way!  Trust yourself and your abilities to make a change, and you can do anything!!

Love your art, love yourself!

Photo 20 Aug 532 notes 
Twin Stars (detail) by Luis Ricardo Falero (1851-1896)
brush and watercolour on off-white paper, 1881

Twin Stars (detail) by Luis Ricardo Falero (1851-1896)

brush and watercolour on off-white paper, 1881

(Source: paintingses)

Photo 20 Aug 238 notes amare-habeo:

Josef Mánes (Czech, 1820 - 1871)
The Drowned, N/D

amare-habeo:

Josef Mánes (Czech, 1820 - 1871)

The Drowned, N/D

via et cetera.
Photo 20 Aug 1,999 notes

(Source: superphazed)

Video 19 Aug 140,532 notes
Video 11 Aug 49 notes

twofacedsheep:

I was able to confirm with my own eyes (and from an information board) that this rare meerkat is a female. She is not an albino, nor is she leucistic. The cause of her skin de-pigmentation is unknown; she was born brown but in late 2012 she randomly started turning white. Vets haven’t found any health or behavioural issues with her condition. She’s a healthy, normal, happy meerkat.”

(Source: deviantart.com)

Video 11 Aug 2,502 notes

erinburr:

tiny-librarian:

A Pennsylvania museum has solved the mystery of a Renaissance portrait in an investigation that spans hundreds of years, layers of paint and the murdered daughter of an Italian duke.

Among the works featured in the Carnegie Museum’s exhibit Faked, Forgotten, Found is a portrait of Isabella de’Medici, the spirited favorite daughter of Cosimo de’Medici, the first Grand Duke of Florence, whose face hadn’t seen the light of day in almost 200 years.

Isabella Medici’s strong nose, steely stare and high forehead plucked of hair, as was the fashion in 1570, was hidden beneath layers of paint applied by a Victorian artist to render the work more saleable to a 19th century buyer.

The result was a pretty, bland face with rosy cheeks and gently smiling lips that Louise Lippincott, curator of fine arts at the museum, thought was a possible fake.

Before deciding to deaccession the work, Lippincott brought the painting, which was purportedly of Eleanor of Toledo, a famed beauty and the mother of Isabella de’Medici, to the Pittsburgh museum’s conservator Ellen Baxter to confirm her suspicions.

Baxter was immediately intrigued. The woman’s clothing was spot-on, with its high lace collar and richly patterned bodice, but her face was all wrong, ‘like a Victorian cookie tin box lid,’ Baxter told Carnegie Magazine.

After finding the stamp of Francis Needham on the back of the work, Baxter did some research and found that Needham worked in National Portrait Gallery in London in the mid-1800s transferring paintings from wood panels to canvas mounts.

Paintings on canvas usually have large cracks, but the ones on the Eleanor of Toledo portrait were much smaller than would be expected.

Baxter devised a theory that the work had been transferred from a wood panel onto canvas and then repainted so that the woman’s face was more pleasing to the Victorian art-buyer, some 300 years after it had been painted.

Source/Read More

Behind every Victorian cookie tin box lid is a badass woman that someone wants to paint over and sell.

Video 11 Aug 2,033 notes

medievalpoc:

Math and Science Week!

aseantoo submitted to medievalpoc:

Bhāskarāchārya

[x], [x]

Bhāskarāchārya / Bhāskara II (1114–1185) was an Indian mathematician and astronomer.

Among his many achievements are the following:

1. He was the first person to explain that when you divide by zero, the result is infinity.

2. He was also the first person to note that a positive number has two square roots - a positive and a negative one.

3. He described the principles of differential calculus 500 years before Leibniz and Newton. (He definitively came up with Rolle’s theorem half a millennium before Rolle himself.)

4. He calculated the length of the rotation of the earth around the sun to 365.2588 days - he was just off by 3 minutes.

Intriguingly, his treatise on arithmetic and geometry, Līlāvatī, is named after his daughter. He addresses her as an eager student:

Oh Līlāvatī, intelligent girl, if you understand addition and subtraction, tell me the sum of the amounts 2, 5, 32, 193, 18, 10, and 100, as well as [the remainder of] those when subtracted from 10000.” and “Fawn-eyed child Līlāvatī, tell me, how much is the number [resulting from] 135 multiplied by 12, if you understand multiplication by separate parts and by separate digits. And tell [me], beautiful one, how much is that product divided by the same multiplier?

These invocations have led some to surmise that Līlāvatī, too, was a mathematician.

Image from here: http://mathdept.ucr.edu/pdf/iwm1.pdf

Story of her introduction to math here: http://4go10tales.blogspot.co.uk/2012/06/lilavati.html

Wikipedia on Bhaskaracharya

Photo 11 Aug 9,866 notes likeafieldmouse:

Eric Baudart - Self-portrait with Eye on Scanner (2009)

likeafieldmouse:

Eric Baudart - Self-portrait with Eye on Scanner (2009)

Photo 11 Aug 429,900 notes stammsternenstaub:

m-m-mad-madness:

engineer—cat:

lumoblaze:

jonkakes:

bigcoolscorner:

merauderdon:

givemeinternet:

As close as you will ever be to a nuclear explosion

THIS IS FUCKING TERRIFYING

No thank you.

The columns of smoke in the foreground are telephone poles boiling

This is way cooler to look at than it should be

Science side of Tumblr would like to add:
Heat is generally transmitted in 3 forms: conduction, convection, radiation.
The fact that the telephone poles and wires are boiling away well before the shockwave hits them indicates that the heat from the explosion has not reached them by convection (much slower than the speed of sound) or by conduction (at best, comparable to the speed of sound), but purely by radiation. In other words: the explosion is bright enough to boil everything.


reblogging again for what engineer—cat said

stammsternenstaub:

m-m-mad-madness:

engineer—cat:

lumoblaze:

jonkakes:

bigcoolscorner:

merauderdon:

givemeinternet:

As close as you will ever be to a nuclear explosion

THIS IS FUCKING TERRIFYING

No thank you.

The columns of smoke in the foreground are telephone poles boiling

This is way cooler to look at than it should be

Science side of Tumblr would like to add:

Heat is generally transmitted in 3 forms: conduction, convection, radiation.

The fact that the telephone poles and wires are boiling away well before the shockwave hits them indicates that the heat from the explosion has not reached them by convection (much slower than the speed of sound) or by conduction (at best, comparable to the speed of sound), but purely by radiation. In other words: the explosion is bright enough to boil everything.

reblogging again for what engineer—cat said

Video 5 Aug 590 notes

jessfink:

Chester 5000 and company at the beach.

via Jess Fink.

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